Purple’s rarity in nature and the expense of creating the colour and has given purple a supernatural aura for centuries. The colour purple is a symbol of wealth, dignity and royalty. It’s also often associated with spirituality, magic and mystery.

2929 ♥2 months ago // via // source

loaded-gunn:

HOW DARE YOU JAKE FUCKING BASS

1998 ♥2 months ago // via // source

croutoncat:

people who randomly decide to compliment you are so important

1039456 ♥2 months ago // via // source

guy:

*blows up balloon* *names it molly* *pops molly* turn up

218853 ♥2 months ago // via

corink:

comatose-kitty:

I literally cant fucking breathe 

IVE BEEN WAITING 2 YEARS FOR THIS VIDEOS RETURN

771497 ♥2 months ago // via

branwyn-says:

roachpatrol:

elementalsight:

gardnerhill:

madlori:

This scene was actually when I went from feeling more or less neutral on Joan to actively disliking her.

Because wow, that was patronizing.

I loved that scene in Elementary.

1) Firstly, because it immediately deconstructs the “hero throws and breaks something in frustration” cliche (Sherlock throwing a glass slide in HoB, anyone?) it might even be seen as a parody of that cliche.

2) Secondly, because the dynamic is different between a man and a woman than it would be between two women or two men, the visual of a man smashing something in a temper in front of a woman can be taken as threatening or borderline abusive. Joan Watson immediately shows that she is not intimidated by Holmes’ behavior.

3) Lastly? One of the running themes of Elementary is the deconstruction of Sherlock Holmes as the solitary, antisocial genius, and his becoming a member of a community. Holmes’ gifts are given their due respect, but no one in Elementary plays the game of Because Sherlock Holmes is a Bloody Genius He Can Do Whatever He Wants So There. When Sherlock goes after Moriarty (“M”), Captain Gregson suspends him. When Sherlock doesn’t want to talk about his addiction, Alfredo says “You’ve got to get over yourself.” And when Sherlock behaves like a spoiled child, Joan tells him “Use your words.”

You see Joan patronizing Sherlock. I see a member of Sherlock’s community teaching him how to behave like an adult member of that community.

Additionally, Watson’s done good work for a number of years as a sober companion, not a manchild enabler. It’s quite literally her job to deconstruct people’s shitty self-defeating habits and demonstrate that there are better ways to live your life. She’s not in the business of humoring anyone or playing along with their tantrums, she’s in the business of fixing them. And what she does works! It gets spelled out explicitely in the text of the show: Sherlock himself admits that what’s changed about him, for the better, is her. 

I think being patronizing is a perfectly reasonable reaction to someone behaving this way, to be honest.

32921 ♥2 months ago // via // source

c0l0rme1d:

stolemyyheart:

zialldowntheaisle:

one-durexion-condoms:

shower-of-cunts-1d:

God, they’re so white

That is an accurate observation

not niall. he was infact black in  apast life. 

crYING

Niall is straight up mayo & vanilla, what’re you talking about??

103341 ♥2 months ago // via // source

rampaigehalseyface:

Christopher Eccleston on the relationship between the Doctor and his companions

I love you.

111525 ♥2 months ago // via // source

goodkwuestion:

note-a-bear:

haymitchdrinksfirewhiskey:

ediebrit:

oh my fucking god

SOMEONE FINALLY SAID IT.

SHOTS FIRED.

holy shit that went deep

OMFG

124133 ♥2 months ago // via // source

amandaonwriting:

The storytelling elements:

1. The Contract

In the very beginning, you have to make a promise. Will this be violent? Scary? Fun? Tense? Dramatic?

2. The Pull

Keep it light in the beginning. You don’t want to scare people away by being too dense — you must trust The Contract.

3. The Incident

This is the event that sets everything in motion. Should occur early and keep the story together.

4. The Reveal

Just before the Point Of No Return, the main character learns what the story is really about.

5. Point Of No Return

The forces of good are faced with an impossible decision that concerns fear, safety, love, hate, revenge or despair.

6. Mini-Climax

Sorry, but you must allow the the forces of evil to have an epic win.

7. All-Is-Lost Moment

The moment where all is lost. You must portray the deepest despair for the forces of good.

8. News Of Hope

This is the possibility for one of the side characters to shine. A light that shines into the total darkness of the moment.

9. Climax

The shit hits the fan and the good puts everything at stake and overcomes — despite impossible odds.

10. The End

Public displays of relief and happiness, love and forgiveness. It’s great! We also learn that the hero has evolved.

Article from Doktor Spinn written by Jerry Silfwer aka Doktor Spinn

25570 ♥2 months ago // via // source

biinarykid:

stunningpicture:

Cookie in a milk cup.

I DONT UNDERSTAND THIS PICTURE AT ALL

413558 ♥2 months ago // via // source

biinarykid:

stunningpicture:

Milk in cookie cup.

I GET THE PHOTO NOW….

559182 ♥2 months ago // via // source

« See? That is the thing with you Plastics. You think that everybody is in love with you, when actually, everybody hates you! Like Aaron Samuels, for example! He broke up with Regina and guess what? He still doesn’t want you! So why are you still messing with Regina, Cady? I’ll tell you why. Because you are a mean girl! You’re a bitch! »

Mean Girls released on April 30th, 2004

23777 ♥2 months ago // via // source
First thought, best thought.
7608 ♥2 months ago // via

sobasicallyroosterteeth:

My school recently “enforced” dress code (blamed the girls instead of teaching boys not to oversexualize them) so I made some signs and I’m going to put them up around my school on Monday.

57929 ♥2 months ago // via // source


Small Cute Blue Gray Pointer